Anthony Marshall

Anthony Marshall

Liquidlight.
Images timeless in their appeal.
Throughout the history of photography, the structure of the image has fascinated photographers. In the early days of this preoccupation with structure it was known as “Formalism”. From the nineteen twenties through to the nineteen seventies Edward Weston, Brett Weston, Siskind and others spent some part of there corea’s experimenting with the structure of the image, whether they were photographing ice shapes, rocks, weathered wood or other simplified subjects.

One of the interesting things about photographs taken in this style has been their success in the gallery. This imagery is refined, but not involved with any difficult issues of content. It raises no political, moral or social questions, neither is it provocative. Formalist pictures rely on elegance of design and are timeless in their appeal, my “Liquidlight” series of canvases follows on from the Formalist tradition although it is no longer called “formalism”. It draws its inspiration from the extraordinary properties of water. More than two-thirds of the earths surface is covered with liquid water. Pure water has no colour, taste, or smell. A pinhead-sized drop of water contains about one billion billion molecules. These attract each other powerfully, especially at the surface, where their mutual attraction forms a strong skin, known as surface tension. Water has an ability to change state easily and is always on the move, the “Liquidlight” imagery attempts to capture natural abstract designs from the fleeting moment when light is reflected off the surface of water. ...See more about Anthony Marshall: click here