Paul Evans

I was delighted when Living Art offered me the invitation to exhibit a few new pieces of work that have evolved from recent experiments in landscape painting. My aim in these experiments has been to develop an approach (or a repertoire of techniques) that honestly and vividly reflects those moments of emotional intensity, joy and excitement that are created by our engagement with the mountains and the oceans.

My contribution to this exhibition centres around two paintings of Chomolungma (Mount Everest) that contrast enormously in scale.

The first is a large, 120cm by 120cm canvas. In this painting I have aimed to capture the sense of drama that accompanies our mental picture of the mountain as much as its visual image. Owing to the dynamic method of its execution, I am aware that some viewers may find this painting challenging. Please give it time – the subject matter is also extremely challenging!

The second painting is a tiny watercolour that measures only 4cm by 4cm. This is designed to represent the remoteness of the objective (something arguably lost to the past) and takes its scale and method of execution from medieval icon painting.
For more examples of my painting – in a different style - please visit:
www.pkevans.co.uk    

Paul Evans : artist
 “one to watch out for”
The Guardian Guide, June10 2006
Paul is a professional artist living and working from his base in Sheffield, England. He has had paintings exhibited in numerous group shows across the country and three one-person exhibitions of his work in Sheffield in the last year. ‘Shroud’ at Persistence Works has received excellent press nationally, regionally and locally.

Before devoting his time fully to painting, Paul had a very successful career as creative director of a Sheffield graphic design company and has also won great acclaim for his illustrations and cartoons.

Paul began his career in adventure sports with rock climbing and has been a keen exponent of the craft for over a quarter of a century; having climbed to a very high standard in the USA, Australia, New Zealand and throughout Europe and the UK.

In the last decade he has chosen to broaden his extreme horizons by snowboarding in Canada and the European Alps, mountain biking throughout the UK (from the Quantocks to the Outer Hebrides) and, lately, surfing in the UK and Portugal His fierce determination and endless appetite for technical improvement has allowed him to “punch above his weight” in all of these sports – leading to some very ‘sketchy’ moments.

Rock climbing highlights
1) Soloing Cemetery Gates E1 5a, Dinas Cromlech (with a chalk bag that I borrowed from an onlooker).
2) Grond E2 5b, Dinas Cromlech.
I used up all of my Friends in the first 12 feet or so. I had carried half a dozen slings to thread the chock-stones, but I couldn’t reach them at the back of the crack - effectively I soloed this awkward, strenuous and very slippery route for three quarters of the way to the top and I was only leading E2 at the time!
3) Bouldering out the start of West Side Story (Fontainebleau 7b) after a party and four cans of Special Brew the night before.
4) Zeke the Freak 8a+/8b redpoint. Took me a whole summer. Nearly lost my mind (and my relationship) through red-point pressure.

Mountain biking highlights:
1) Co-authored Dark Peak Mountain Biking True Grit Trails.
2) I derive enormous pleasure and satisfaction from the high mountain excursions in the British hills - such as the epic climb and the brilliant descent of the Snowdon bridleways and the route around High Street in the Lake District.
3) The circuit of Ladybower (Derbyshire Peak District) - one of the best and most varied mountain bike routes anywhere. I like to get this under my belt at least once a month.
Snowboarding highlight
Descent of Couloir des Pyramides, Courcheval, France about four days before it avalanched!

Surfing highlight;
New to this game but I absolutely love it – it’s so difficult it’s untrue!
A significant highlight for me so far is my attempt to surf head and a half high waves on Tiree (Inner Hebrides). I can’t say I succeeded and it was the most terrifying experience of my life but at least I’ve lived to tell the tale!